Blog: Compliance Industrial Pulpit

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Although I find his analysis of P2P production incorrect, Dmitri Kleiner I believe is right to point out the important difference between the way big business has a split personailty/ double standard when it comes to copyleft software. One is to use it for their own purposes at will, but to absolutely deny it for consumers:

…publishing firms and entertainment industry giants will support the creation of copyleft software [for infrastructure] …they will not support the creation of copyleft [software for use by consumers (apps etc.)].

Kleiner, D., 2010. The telekommunist manifesto. Institute of Network Cultures Amsterdam.

The reason I think this distinction is important is because it explains a lot of the odd behavior we see in real life… i.e. Big Tech are big supporters of Linux Foundation/SPDX and so forth but ban strong copyleft licenses via OSI and code from their apps/apis and so forth from their repos?

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One of the really resonant points I’ve heard from Bruce Perens and others is that LF in particular strongly encourages compliance, but also strongly discourages enforcement. I see that’s true, empirically. But I’m still not sure how it comes about.

Really? Even when you look at the incentives? If compliance is the Mise-en-scène, where the main protagonists like Disney, Netflix, Amazon join hands and smiling and waving in triumph in the finale, absorbed in its fiction - enforcement is like Breaking the Fourth Wall isn’t it? It reveals the naked hostility between all these actors?

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