On Apps and Coffee – iA Writer

No matter how many times developers compare their apps to coffee… apps are not coffee. The question is not: How many coffees does an app cost? It’s: How many apps does a coffee cost? And the answer is: Apps are not coffee but coffee machines.

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I’ve used iawriter. Especially when I’ve been hurt and had to do all my computing on tablet,

Yep. It’s got Micropub support with <Micro.blog> support out of the box.

Making copies of bits is free. Long term maintenance and feature additions is what costs.

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This resonated a lot with the idea that you should just ignore free, cheap, and whiny mass customers and focus on those who actually care and pay accordingly. What’s that company that makes the really pricey structured note taking app for Mac?

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If I recall correctly, when the Michelin company started producing guidebooks to cool places to visit in order to encourage people to go there, thereby consuming their tires faster, thereby increasing consumption of tires; the guidebooks were originally given away for free in the hopes of gaining mass adoption.

They achieved their goal, but later realized that people didn’t take the guidebooks seriously.

They concluded that the fact that the guidebooks were free meant people didn’t care about them. Basically, people don’t respect that which has no cost.

So Michelin started charging for the guidebooks, just to kind convince people to actually take them seriously.

This resonated a lot with the idea that you should just ignore free, cheap, and whiny mass customers and focus on those who actually care and pay accordingly.

If a user cannot respect your work, then you are better off without that user.

Every customer has an associated cost for a business, in terms of support, sales, etc.
This is specially true in software, where we have to deal with bug reports, features suggested by others, or maybe modifying the software to cater to the special needs of some users.

Every user that does not contribute to your bottom line, is not only doing you a disservice, but also harming other users; because every hour spent helping them is an hour you didn’t spend on the others.

It amazes me that programmers are dead-set against doing things that the business world regards as common sense.

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